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Spain asks citizens to cough, say “ahh” and pull out their wallets for health care

Story by Olivia Sears

SALAMANCA – Over the past two years, Concepción Quill, 85, has seen the cost of her insulin prescription go from nothing to $5.65 a month. Though a small increase, the notion of paying for medications is new to Quill and other low-income Spaniards who are now worried about their access to long-term treatment.

“I have had Type I diabetes my whole life. I need insulin treatments each day, three times,” the Madrid resident said through a translator from her wheelchair on a visit to Salamanca. A retired secretary living off a limited public pension, Quill explained that her family has picked up the bill for her rising medical costs.

Quill is among the 870,000 who have been affected by recent health care cuts passed by the Spanish government.

Dr. Leire Ochoa has worked at the Hospital de la Santísima Trinidad in Salamanca for the past two years, where patients are worried about new legislation that restricts access to health care.

Dr. Leire Ochoa has worked at the Hospital de la Santísima Trinidad in Salamanca for the past two years, where patients are worried about new legislation that restricts access to health care.

As a part of the Spanish government’s austerity measures, state health care spending decreased 13 percent in 2012 and another 16 percent in 2013. The cuts are the result of the passage of the “Royal Decree Law 16/2012” which denies health care access to undocumented foreigners unless they are pregnant, under the age of 18 or in need of emergency care. In addition to eliminating universal health care, the law also reduces financing for more than 400 different medications including insulin treatments for people with diabetes.

In the two years since its introduction, the law has forced patients without private insurance to adjust to a new health care system with narrower coverage options and higher out-of-pocket expenses. Individuals requiring prescriptions for chronic illnesses including Hepatitis B and C, multiple sclerosis, some types of cancers and diabetes are particularly affected.

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